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July 16th, 2014, 08:02 AM
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Re: TANCET MBA Exam Solved Model question Papers

As per your request here I am sharing the last year solved model Question paper of TANCET MBA Exam


The following passage was excerpted from a book called ‘The Extraordinary Origins of Everyday Things’, which was published in 1987. Because early man viewed illness as divine punishment and healing as purification, medicine and religion were inextricably linked for centuries. This notion is apparent in the origin of our word “pharmacy,” which comes from the Greek pharmakon, meaning “purification through purging”. By 3500 B.C the Sumerians in the Tigris-Euphrates Valley had developed virtually all of our modern methods of administering drugs. They used gargles, inhalations, pills, lotions, ointments and plasters. The first drug catalog or pharmacopoeia, was written at that time by an unknown Sumerian physician. Preserved in cuneiform script on a single clay tablet are the names of dozens of drugs to treat ailments that still afflict us today.The Egyptians added to the ancient medicine chest. The Ebers Papyrus, scroll dating from 1900 B.C. and named after the German Egyptologist George Ebers, reveals the trial-and-error know-how acquired by early Egyptian physicians. To relieve indigestion, a chew of peppermint leaves and carbonates (known today as antacids) was prescribed and to numb the pain of tooth extraction, Egyptian doctors temporarily stupefied a patient with ethyl alcohol.The scroll also provides a rare glimpse into the hierarchy of ancient drug preparation. The “chief of the preparers of drugs” was the equivalent of a head pharmacist, who supervised the “collectors of drugs,” field workers who gathered essential minerals and herbs. The “preparers’ aides” (technicians) dried and pulverized ingredients, which were blended according to certain formulae by the “preparers”. And the ‘conservator of drugs” oversaw the storehouse where local and imported mineral, herb and animal-organ ingredients were kept.By the seventh century B.C., the Greeks had adopted a sophisticated mind-body view of medicine. They believed that a physician must pursue the diagnosis and treatment of the physical (body) causes of disease within a scientific framework, as well as cure the supernatural (mind) components involved. Thus, the early Greek physician emphasized something to a holistic approach to health, even if the suspected “mental” causes of disease were not recognized as stress and depression but interpreted as curses from displeased deities.The Modern era of pharmacology began in the sixteenth century, ushered in by the first major discoveries in chemistry. The understanding of how chemicals interact to produce certain effects within the body would eventually remove much if the guess work and magic from medicine.Drugs had been launched on a scientific course, but centuries would pass before superstition was displaced by scientific fact. One major reason was that physicians, unaware of the existence of disease-causing pathogens such as bacteria and viruses, continued to dream up imaginary causative evils. And though new chemical compounds emerged, their effectiveness in treating disease was still based largely on trial and error.Many standard, common drugs in the medicine chest developed in this trial-and-error environment. Such is the complexity of disease and human biochemistry that even today, despite enormous strides in medical science, many of the latest sophisticated additions to our medicine chest shelves were accidental finds.The author cites the literal definition of the Greek word pharmakon in order to
A show that ancient civilizations had an advanced form of medical science
B point out that many of the beliefs of ancient civilizations are still held today
C illustrate that early man thought recovery from illness was linked to internal cleansing
D stress and mental and physical causes of disease
E emphasise the primitive nature of Greek medical science

A the presence of some flaws in its education
B some inherent lack of co-ordination among its various elements
C some basic misunderstanding in its society
D the energy it has devoted to education
E none of the above
Question 2
According to the writer, Lord Snow sees the intellectual life of Western society as split between
A the educated and the uneducated
B the government servants and the plebeians
C scientists and literary intellectuals
D administrators and intellectuals
E none of the above
Question 3
The writer seems to criticize the belief that
A education gives rise to further complexities as the civilization progresses
B all new problems and complexities can be tackled and solved by more and better education
C people need to learn more in order to earn more
D all of the above
E none of the above
Question 4
What, according to the author, would be the definition of ‘prejudice’?
A Ideas that help people to identify with new situations
B Fixed ideas with which people think without being aware of doing so
C Ideas that people cull from experience in order to judge a situation
D Fixed ideas that see a person through the trails and tribulations of life
E None of the above
Question 5
According to Lord Snow, which of the following groups need to be educated enough to at least understand the works of scientists and engineers?
A politicians, administrators, and the entire community
B politicians and literary intellectuals
C politicians and the laymen
D all of the above
E none of the above
Question 6
In the passage, the writer questions
A the neutrality of science
B scientists’ stand on the neutrality of science
C scientists’ stand on the neutrality of their labours
D Lord Snow’s assertion regarding the potential of intellectual in society
E none of the above
Question 7
The author’s assertion in the passage is that education’s main responsibility is to
A transmit ideas of value
B transmit technical knowledge
C both (1) and (2)
D transmit values regarding human and social norms
E none of the above
Question 8
The author believes that
A the gulf between science and literature needs to be bridged
B ideas should be maintained for a holistic view of society and its problems
C words are not ideas
D all of the above
E none of the above
Question 9
Thinking is
A being
B application of pre-existing idea to a situation
C knowing
D application of fixed ideas to a situation
E none of the above
Question 10
PASSAGE-2 The following passage was excerpted from a book called ‘The Extraordinary Origins of Everyday Things’, which was published in 1987. Because early man viewed illness as divine punishment and healing as purification, medicine and religion were inextricably linked for centuries. This notion is apparent in the origin of our word “pharmacy,” which comes from the Greek pharmakon, meaning “purification through purging”. By 3500 B.C the Sumerians in the Tigris-Euphrates Valley had developed virtually all of our modern methods of administering drugs. They used gargles, inhalations, pills, lotions, ointments and plasters. The first drug catalog or pharmacopoeia, was written at that time by an unknown Sumerian physician. Preserved in cuneiform script on a single clay tablet are the names of dozens of drugs to treat ailments that still afflict us today.The Egyptians added to the ancient medicine chest. The Ebers Papyrus, scroll dating from 1900 B.C. and named after the German Egyptologist George Ebers, reveals the trial-and-error know-how acquired by early Egyptian physicians. To relieve indigestion, a chew of peppermint leaves and carbonates (known today as antacids) was prescribed and to numb the pain of tooth extraction, Egyptian doctors temporarily stupefied a patient with ethyl alcohol.The scroll also provides a rare glimpse into the hierarchy of ancient drug preparation. The “chief of the preparers of drugs” was the equivalent of a head pharmacist, who supervised the “collectors of drugs,” field workers who gathered essential minerals and herbs. The “preparers’ aides” (technicians) dried and pulverized ingredients, which were blended according to certain formulae by the “preparers”. And the ‘conservator of drugs” oversaw the storehouse where local and imported mineral, herb and animal-organ ingredients were kept.By the seventh century B.C., the Greeks had adopted a sophisticated mind-body view of medicine. They believed that a physician must pursue the diagnosis and treatment of the physical (body) causes of disease within a scientific framework, as well as cure the supernatural (mind) components involved. Thus, the early Greek physician emphasized something to a holistic approach to health, even if the suspected “mental” causes of disease were not recognized as stress and depression but interpreted as curses from displeased deities.The Modern era of pharmacology began in the sixteenth century, ushered in by the first major discoveries in chemistry. The understanding of how chemicals interact to produce certain effects within the body would eventually remove much if the guess work and magic from medicine.Drugs had been launched on a scientific course, but centuries would pass before superstition was displaced by scientific fact. One major reason was that physicians, unaware of the existence of disease-causing pathogens such as bacteria and viruses, continued to dream up imaginary causative evils. And though new chemical compounds emerged, their effectiveness in treating disease was still based largely on trial and error.Many standard, common drugs in the medicine chest developed in this trial-and-error environment. Such is the complexity of disease and human biochemistry that even today, despite enormous strides in medical science, many of the latest sophisticated additions to our medicine chest shelves were accidental finds.The author cites the literal definition of the Greek word pharmakon in order to
A show that ancient civilizations had an advanced form of medical science
B point out that many of the beliefs of ancient civilizations are still held today
C illustrate that early man thought recovery from illness was linked to internal cleansing
D stress and mental and physical causes of disease
E emphasise the primitive nature of Greek medical science
Question 11
It was possible to identify a number of early Sumerian drugs because
A traces of these drugs were discovered archaeological excavations
B the ancient Egyptians latter adopted the same medications
C Sumerians religious texts explained many drug making techniques
D a pharmacopocia in Europe contained detailed recipes for ancient drugs
E a list of drugs and preparations was compiled by an ancient Sumerian
Question 12
The passage suggests which one of following as a similarity between ancient Sumerian drugs and modern drugs?
A ancient Sumerian drugs were made of the same chemical as modern drugs
B like modern drugs, ancient Sumerian drugs were used for both mental and physical disorders
C the different ways patients could take ancient Sumerian drugs are similar to the ways modern drugs are taken
D both ancient Sumerian drugs and modern drugs are products of sophisticated chemical research
E hierarchically organized groups of labourers are responsible for the preparation of both ancient Sumerian and modern drugs
Question 13
According to the passage, the seventh-century Greeks’ view of medicine differed from that of the Sumerians is that the Greeks
A discovered more advanced chemical applications of drugs
B acknowledged both the mental and physical roots of illness
C attributed disease to psychological, rather than physical causes
D established a rigid hierarchy for the preparation of drugs
E developed most of the precursors of modern drugs
Question 14
The “hierarchy” referred to in the passage is an example of
A A superstitious practice
B the relative severity of ancient diseases
C the role of physicians in Egyptian society
D a complex division of labour
E a receipt for ancient drug
Question 15
In the final paragraph, the author makes which one of the following observations about scientific discovery?
A Human biochemistry is such a complex science that important discoveries are uncommon
B Chance events have led to the discovery of many modern drugs
C Many cures for common diseases have yet to be discovered
D Trial and error is the best avenue to scientific discovery
E Most of the important discoveries made in the scientific community have been inadvertent
Question 16
It can be inferred from the passage that some drugs commonly used in 1987
A were not created intentionally
B caused the very diseases that they were designed to combat
C were meant to treat imaginary causative evils
D were created in the sixteenth century
E are now known to be ineffective
Question 17
The passage implies that
A ancient Greek medicine was superior to ancient Egyptian medicine
B some maladies have supernatural causes
C a modern head pharmacist is analogous to an ancient Egyptian conservator of drugs
D most ailments that afflicted the ancient Sumerians still afflict modern human beings
E the ancient Egyptians made no major discoveries in the field of chemistry
Question 18
In the passage, the word “holistic” most nearly means
A psychological
B modern
C physiological
D comprehensive
E homeopathic
Question 19
The passage indicates that advances in medical science during the modern era of pharmacology may have been delayed by
A the lack of a clear understanding of the origins of disease
B primitive surgical methods
C a shortage of chemical treatments for disease
D an inaccuracy in pharmaceutical preparation
E an overemphasis on the psychological causes of disease
Question 20
If x2 – 3xy + λy2 + 3x - 5y + 2=0 represents a pair of straight lines, than the value of λ is
A 4
B 3
C 2
D 1
E cannot be determined
Question 21
If S is 150 percent of T, than T is what percent of S + T?
A 33 1/3
B 40
C 75
D 80
E 85
Question 22
At the first stop on his route, a driver unloaded 2/5 of the packages from his van. After he unloaded another three packages at the next stop, ½ of the orginial number of packages in the van remained. How many packages were in the van before the first delivery?
A 10
B 25
C 30
D 36
E 40
Question 23
R.s 1,000 bonus is to be divided among three people so that Ram receives twice as much as Sam, who receives 1/5 as much as Guna. How much money should Guna receive?
A R.s 100
B R.s 250
C R.s 375
D R.s 625
E R.s 750
Question 24
If x = 2 + 21/3 + 21/3, than the value of x3 – 6x2 + 6x is
A 3
B 2
C 1
D -1
E none of the above
Question 25
A jar contains black and white marbles. If there are ten marbles in the jar, than which of the following could NOT be the ratio of black and white marbles?
A 9:1
B 7:3
C 1:10
D 1:4
E 1:2
Question 26
A tank with capacity T litres is empty. If water flows into the tank from pipe X at the rate of X litres per minute and water is pumped out by pipe Y at the rate of Y litres per minute and X>Y, than in how many minutes will the tank be filled?
A T/(Y-X)
B T/(X-Y)
C (T-X)/Y
D (X-Y)60T
E (X-Y)T
Question 27
Determine the ratio of the number of people having characteristic X to the number of people having characteristic Y in a population of 100 subjects from the following table Having X and Y 10 Having X but not Y 30 Having Y but X 20 Having neither X nor Y 40
A 4:3
B 3:2
C 1:2
D 2:3
E 3:4
Question 28
The interest charged on a loan is R.s x per 1000 for the first month and R.s y per 1000 for each succeeding month. How much interest will be charged during the first 3 months on a loan of R.s 15,000?
A 20x + 10y
B 10x + 20y
C 15x + 30y
D x + 2y
E 30x + 15y
Question 29
There are three cities: A, B and C. Each of these cities is connected with the other two cities by at least one direct road. If a traveller wants to go from one city (origin) to another city (destination), she can do so either by traversing a road connecting the two cities directly, or by traversing two roads the first connecting the origin to the third city and the second connecting the third city to the destination. In all, there are 33 routes from A to B (including those via C). Similarly, there are 23 routes from B to C (including those via A). How many roads are there from A to C directly?
A 6
B 3
C 5
D 10
E 12
Question 30
You can collect rubies and emeralds as many as you can. Each ruby is worth R.s 4 crore and each emerald is worth of R.s 5 crore. Each ruby weighs 0.3 kg and each emerald weighs 0.4 kg. Your bag can carry at the most 12kg. What you should collect to get the maximum wealth?
A 20 rubies and 15 emeralds
B 40 rubies
C 28 rubies and 9 emeralds
D 16 rubies and 6 emeralds
E none of the above
Question 31
A piece of paper is in the shape of a right angled triangle and is cut along a line that is parallel to the hypotenuse, leaving a smaller triangle. There was a 35% reduction in the length of the hypotenuse of the triangle. If the area of the original triangle was 34 square inches before the cut, what is the area (in square inches) of the smaller triangle?
A 16.665
B 16.565
C 15.465
D 14.365
E 15.565
Question 32
It takes 30 days to fill a laboratory dish with bacteria. If the size of the bacteria colony doubles each day, how long will it take for the bacteria to fill one half of the disk?
A 10 days
B 15 days
C 24 days
D 29 days
E 29.5 days
Attached Files
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